SHOW AND TELL

SHOW AND TELL

us discount viagra overnight delivery IMG_2532[1]As far as I know, there is no proper Spanish expression for this primary school activity in which children bring a souvenir, a photograph or an object of sentimental value into the classroom from home and talk about it in front of the class. ‘Muestra y comparte’ is the closest I can think of.  It wasn’t done in England when I was a child and my husband can’t recall having ever done it in Mexico.  It is, however, a Canadian grade-school staple and I have memories of my children scrambling around the house the morning-of, trying to find something to take in.  Or then there was the time my daughter Rebecca forgot about it altogether and talked about the very clothes on her back.  Lessons learned?  Always dress well and think on your toes.

http://gisellemosley.com/?search=generic-viagra-in-canada Over the years, I’ve used this pedagogical gem usually reserved for six-year-olds in my Spanish classes for adults.  I ask them to bring in something from home and then I ask them questions about it, using whatever verb tense we happen to be practicing at the time.  If they’ve forgotten to tuck something special in their bag before work in the morning, no worries.  They can pull a Rebecca and talk about something they have on them — a piece of jewellry, a scarf, a briefcase, a picture in their wallet.  Or they can answer questions about an object that has some significance in their lives but that they forgot to bring in. In the beginners’ class, I keep the questions in the present tense.  ¿De dónde viene el objeto?  ¿Cuántos años tiene? ¿Por qué tiene valor para tí?  ¿Cómo es? ¿Grande? ¿Pequeño?  ¿Bonito? ¿Viejo?  ¿Nuevo? ¿Dónde lo guardas en tu casa?   If the class is more advanced, we can bring in the preterite and the imperfect.  ¿Cuándo lo compraste? ¿Dónde lo compraste? ¿Cómo era el lugar donde lo compraste? ¿De quién lo recibiste? ¿Cómo era la persona quien te lo dio?  So on and so forth.IMG_2531[1]

http://whenwaterwaseverywhere.com/?x=female-viagra-sales-canadian-pharmacy With Remembrance Day, El Día de los Veteranos, around the corner, I thought I’d give you a brief example from my own life, something I often do to set the stage for a class activity. ‘Estas cosas — el manuscrito de la música y las cartas — son de Inglaterra, del año 1941.  Mi abuelo los escribió durante la segunda guerra mundial.  Mi abuelo era alto, rubio y delgado, romántico e inteligente con un gran talento musical.  Durante la guerra, él tocaba el piano en una banda y muchas veces, copiaba la música a mano porque no tenía el dinero para comprar las hojas musicales de las canciones populares.  La canción en la foto es una de las canciones que él copió en aquel tiempo y las cartas son las que mandó a mi abuela durante su noviazgo.’

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